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Obese Osteoarthritis Patients Benefit From Weight Management ProgrammesObese Osteoarthritis Patients Benefit From Weight Management Programmes

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The link between arthritis and obesity is well established: it´s known that being seriously overweight is bad for your joints. Research has shown that people with a body mass index (BMI) of 36 or more are 14 times more likely to develop osteoarthritis of the knee compared to those in a healthy weight range.

So it´s no surprise to see the findings of a new study in Denmark which demonstrated that obese people affected by knee osteoarthritis can benefit from weight management programmes.

Specialists at the University of Copenhagen and the Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital set out to compare the outcomes for obese patients with knee osteoarthritis who, after an intensive weight loss regimen, received one year of dietary support or knee exercise training, compared to those who were not given any formal assistance.

A total of 192 obese participants with knee OA were enrolled in the study, with a mean age of 62.5 years and a mean entry weight of 103.2 kg. They were randomly assigned to one of three groups and began a 16-week dietary regimen designed to achieve a major weight loss. This was followed by 52 weeks of dietary or exercise-based maintenance, with the control group receiving no further attention.

Results published in the Arthritis Care & Research journal show that the mean weight loss after the first phase was 12.8 kg. After a year on maintenance therapy, the dietary assistance group sustained a lower weight than those in the other two groups. The researchers noted that adherence was low in the exercise group.

However, all groups benefited from a statistically significant reduction in pain, and there was little difference between the groups in terms of the level of improvement or the number of people who responded to treatment.

The authors of the report concluded that a significant weight reduction with a one-year maintenance programme improves knee OA symptoms, regardless of the type of maintenance programme chosen.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/acr.22504/abstract

http://www.sportsarthritisresearchuk.org/seoa/news/weight-loss-programmes-can-benefit-obese-osteoarthritis-patients.aspx

http://www.arthritisresearchuk.org/arthritis-information/arthritis-today-magazine/146-autumn-2009/obesity-is-bad-for-your-joints.aspx

The link between arthritis and obesity is well established: it´s known that being seriously overweight is bad for your joints. Research has shown that people with a body mass index (BMI) of 36 or more are 14 times more likely to develop osteoarthritis of the knee compared to those in a healthy weight range.

So it´s no surprise to see the findings of a new study in Denmark which demonstrated that obese people affected by knee osteoarthritis can benefit from weight management programmes.

Specialists at the University of Copenhagen and the Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital set out to compare the outcomes for obese patients with knee osteoarthritis who, after an intensive weight loss regimen, received one year of dietary support or knee exercise training, compared to those who were not given any formal assistance.

A total of 192 obese participants with knee OA were enrolled in the study, with a mean age of 62.5 years and a mean entry weight of 103.2 kg. They were randomly assigned to one of three groups and began a 16-week dietary regimen designed to achieve a major weight loss. This was followed by 52 weeks of dietary or exercise-based maintenance, with the control group receiving no further attention.

Results published in the Arthritis Care & Research journal show that the mean weight loss after the first phase was 12.8 kg. After a year on maintenance therapy, the dietary assistance group sustained a lower weight than those in the other two groups. The researchers noted that adherence was low in the exercise group.

However, all groups benefited from a statistically significant reduction in pain, and there was little difference between the groups in terms of the level of improvement or the number of people who responded to treatment.

The authors of the report concluded that a significant weight reduction with a one-year maintenance programme improves knee OA symptoms, regardless of the type of maintenance programme chosen.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/acr.22504/abstract

http://www.sportsarthritisresearchuk.org/seoa/news/weight-loss-programmes-can-benefit-obese-osteoarthritis-patients.aspx

http://www.arthritisresearchuk.org/arthritis-information/arthritis-today-magazine/146-autumn-2009/obesity-is-bad-for-your-joints.aspx