November 2015

UK RESEARCHERS FIND NEW WAY OF TREATING ARTHRITIS

Researchers at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) have identified a potential new way of treating joints affected by arthritis. Their study indicates that arthritic cartilage, previously thought impenetrable to therapies, could be treated by a patient´s own ‘microvesicles´ that are able to travel into cartilage cells and deliver therapeutic agents. Fluid in human joints […]

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Playing football strengthens bones of men with prostate cancer

Football training is not just good for your heart and muscles — it´s good for your bones, too. A new study shows that the number of times players accelerate and brake during football training is linked to changes in leg bone mass. That´s because being challenged by an opponent, changing direction, kicking and blocking the

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WRIST FRACTURE IN WOMEN CAN POINT TO FUTURE RISK OF SERIOUS FRACTURES

Women who suffer a wrist fracture face a higher risk of more serious fractures in other parts of their bodies later in life, new research suggests. The study, conducted by the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), used information from the Women´s Health Initiative, a major study in which more than 160,000 women aged 50+

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GE AND NBA OFFER FUNDING FOR RESEARCH INTO TENDON INJURIES

GE Healthcare is seeking to accelerate research on the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of tendon injuries (tendinopathy). The company has teamed up with the National Basketball Association (NBA) in the United States to launch a call for research proposals focused on tendinopathy. The two partners plan to support research into musculoskeletal injuries that affect basketball

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Resistance training program beneficial for hand osteoarthritis

Resistance strength training could be used to help treat the pain associated with osteoarthritis in the hands, new research has revealed. Osteoarthritis, also known as degenerative joint disease, is caused by joint cartilage being broken down over a period of time. Cartilage is present at the end of bones and helps enable joint movement without

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COULD ASPIRIN HELP CURE SHOULDER PAIN?

Aspirin could be the key to providing relief to those suffering from painful inflammation. This is according to a study, which was published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, looking at tendons collected from patients experiencing shoulder pain. Talking about the study, Dr Stephanie Dakin from Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences (NDORMS)

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Playing football can help prevent osteoporosis, say Spanish researchers

Participating in certain sports during adolescence can help reduce the risk of developing osteoporosis in later life, according to a Spanish study published in the Journal of Sports Sciences. The researchers said that doing exercise during puberty can improve bone health in adulthood, with sports such as football, handball and basketball more effective than others

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ARTHRITIS: BRAIN CHEMISTRY CHANGES TO HELP COPE WITH SEVERE PAIN

Scientists at the University of Manchester have found that the number of opiate receptors in the brain increases to combat severe pain in people with arthritis. It has long been known that we have receptors in our brains that respond to natural painkilling opiates such as endorphins, but the researchers in Manchester have shown for

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